Jestersix

Power supply for VarioS-2 pump

nly04

Supporting Member
I lost the 24V, 2.5A power supply for the ReefOctopus VarioS-2 pump. I have some 19V, 3A laying around, do you think it will work?
 

richiev

Supporting Member
If I'm right and the pump is worth $230, even if the answer was probably I'd still just buy any other equivalently spec 'ed power supply for likely $20 on Amazon.

Example:

ALITOVE AC 100-240V to DC 24V 5A Power Supply Adapter Converter with 5.5 x 2.1mm 2.5mm DC Output Jack for 5050 3528 LED Strip Module Light https://a.co/d/h2sJHIP

However the answer is likely that it might work, especially given that pump is controllable. The pump probably won't care, but the controller might. You could potentially try it and see, it likely isn't going to blow given you'd undervolt it versus over, but ya never know, and even if it works fine initially it might not later.
 

Qwiv

Supporting Member
Since the voltage is lower, you can plug it in to see if it works without worry of damage. Would likely just run the pump slower then designed. The power supply for the control circuit will likely convert 19v to 5v for the computer just fine. Those are pretty robust to voltage input.

Make sure the polarity of the power supply in correct though and not opposite. Should say on the power supply if the center pin is + or - I just looked at mine and it shows center pin positive.
 

JVU

President
BOD
If the fun for you is messing with electronics, tinker away and if you break it just consider it the cost of your entertainment. I doubt the controller will work correctly with a differently spec’d power supply.

If you are trying to get the pump working again without drama, just buy the correct replacement power supply from CoralVue even though it’s probably overpriced.
 

Qwiv

Supporting Member
If the fun for you is messing with electronics, tinker away and if you break it just consider it the cost of your entertainment. I doubt the controller will work correctly with a differently spec’d power supply.

If you are trying to get the pump working again without drama, just buy the correct replacement power supply from CoralVue even though it’s probably overpriced.
Ahh, don't be so scared of electronics. It's not all smoke and mirrors. DC Power supplies are not as consistent to output as one thinks. Like your 12v battery in your car is 10-14v, in reality a power supply will often vary from the label in actual output.

The controller will have 2 things inside. 1 - Something to convert the 24v DC to whatever voltage the microprocessor is running on. I'd guess 5v, but could be anything really. New power circuits accept a wide voltage input (like a buck converter) and convert to the correct output or if a really dumb circuit (resistors) will just make less power then the controller needs as the voltage out has a relationship to voltage in. Under voltage in, under voltage out. If there isn't enough voltage controller or LEDs will not power on, like a dead battery still makes electricity, just not enough.
2 - The controller will regulate the input to the motors via some motor control method. Its modulating the power (on/off quickly) so the motor will see 19v vs. 24v through this control circuit. This will cause the motor to spin slower. Not a big deal either, it will just never reach the 24v speeds which it about a 20% Hit to the speed if linear. You could control a DC motor with voltage in vs modulation, but the circuit needed to do that is much bigger (old tech) and not very controller friendly.

There are some electronics that are very voltage sensitive, but those are typically old (predigital stuff) or measuring devises, etc. Pumps are pretty stupid so you just don't want to supply more power then they are designed for. Less is ok, it will just not perform as well.
 

JVU

President
BOD
Ahh, don't be so scared of electronics. It's not all smoke and mirrors. DC Power supplies are not as consistent to output as one thinks. Like your 12v battery in your car is 10-14v, in reality a power supply will often vary from the label in actual output.

The controller will have 2 things inside. 1 - Something to convert the 24v DC to whatever voltage the microprocessor is running on. I'd guess 5v, but could be anything really. New power circuits accept a wide voltage input (like a buck converter) and convert to the correct output or if a really dumb circuit (resistors) will just make less power then the controller needs as the voltage out has a relationship to voltage in. Under voltage in, under voltage out. If there isn't enough voltage controller or LEDs will not power on, like a dead battery still makes electricity, just not enough.
2 - The controller will regulate the input to the motors via some motor control method. Its modulating the power (on/off quickly) so the motor will see 19v vs. 24v through this control circuit. This will cause the motor to spin slower. Not a big deal either, it will just never reach the 24v speeds which it about a 20% Hit to the speed if linear. You could control a DC motor with voltage in vs modulation, but the circuit needed to do that is much bigger (old tech) and not very controller friendly.

There are some electronics that are very voltage sensitive, but those are typically old (predigital stuff) or measuring devises, etc. Pumps are pretty stupid so you just don't want to supply more power then they are designed for. Less is ok, it will just not perform as well.
Lol, like I said, and the above is an example of option A :) Everyone likes different things about this hobby and that’s cool.
 
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