Kessil

Well school is suspending in person classes

sfsuphysics

BOD
Staff member
Due to rising number of cases in San Francisco of COVID-19 the Board of Trustees of City College of SF decided to stop face-to-face meetings of classes after the end of this week through potentially the end of the semester. Lowell high school shut down earlier, and honestly I expect the entire SFUSD to follow suit in some way. I would not be too shocked it you didn't see that elsewhere throughout the Bay Area, so those with kids in school might want to start thinking of alternative plans to the schools being a "babysitter" from 8am-3pm (or whenever kids are in school these days), better to have a plan of action than to just have it drop on you at a moment's notice.

Now with CCSF, there is a "plan" (i.e. they told is, this is what we want now figure out how to do it) to have classes get transferred into some online version of them so that students can finish up the semester, and they can justify paying us teachers :D. Not sure how that would translate to kids in K-12 though, I mean hell I see any particular student for 3 hours A WEEK, elementary schools see students for 7 hours A DAY times 5 days a week.
 

rygh

Webmaster
Staff member
I was sent home Friday. :)
Sort of. Our company policy is to work from home if possible and effective. Easy for me.
So no problem if our kids day care (high school) is closed.
 

xcaret

Guest
SJSU also has cancelled classes this week, I believe online is open to students; for SFUSD, parents have the option to keep kids at home without the worry of the absence but they have to inform the school. My child in middle can do schoolwork on google classroom but she is attending school (she doesn’t want to but I would no be paid to “babysit” for her)
The thing to wonder is what if (I hate what ifs) at the end of the two week “quarantine”, someone shows symptoms of X, would the entire quarantine be a total waste?
I’ll keep living my normal life for the time being...
 

sfsuphysics

BOD
Staff member
Well they never mentioned 2 week quarantine period for us, although it kind of seems that way with them moving up spring break a week, so next week + spring break = 2 weeks, but the way they're telling us to figure out an online work around (really fun for lab classes!) and the fact they mentioned that the decision to cancel classes will last to the end of the semester seems like they're preparing for the long haul. This is not a "quarantine" procedure, but a move to limit the spread by limiting crowded areas as possible, such as school, definitely should be prepared to have this last longer than 2 weeks. Like I said I don't know how they're going to do that with K-12 school though.
 

Baykes

Guest
Yeah getting a little uneasy in the k-12 scene especially since funding is based solely on attendance. Just waiting to hear from the higher up to tell us in the IT department, “Ok so how can we get ~10000 students on internet based learning by tomorrow”...

Interestingly the county had issued a statement saying children K-12 are not considered an at risk age so not recommending school closure
 

Flagg37

Supporting Member
I don’t understand what the big deal is. The regular seasonal flu kills way more people. If you’re old or have some other illness that puts you at a higher risk then take the extra precautions that you would for the flu, otherwise it should be business as usual.
 

sfsuphysics

BOD
Staff member
Well I'm not really on either side of the extreme with this either the "OMG the apocalypse!!!!" or the other side aka The Trump view :D
That said yeah 34,000+ died from the flu, but that was out of 35 million or so that got it (last year's CDC stats), right now we have I think a bit over 4000 deaths but only about 100,000 cases (reported) so as a percentage it's considerably more nastier than the seasonal flu, at least towards those with health issues (e.g. elderly) but I think the big deal is that they simply don't want one person "being strong" (aka stubborn) that ends up getting everyone sick, and then you get those huge explosion of cases.

We will see what happens. All I know is after this week I get to work from home, which isn't necessarily a bad thing :D
 

max_nano

Supporting Member
SCU is online only until 4/13. Finals next week, spring break, then first two weeks of spring are online


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

iCon

Guest
There’s a lot of info and mid-info out there. I found this to be informative, but it’s just another view. Albeit, a scientific one.


Well I'm not really on either side of the extreme with this either the "OMG the apocalypse!!!!" or the other side aka The Trump view :D
That said yeah 34,000+ died from the flu, but that was out of 35 million or so that got it (last year's CDC stats), right now we have I think a bit over 4000 deaths but only about 100,000 cases (reported) so as a percentage it's considerably more nastier than the seasonal flu, at least towards those with health issues (e.g. elderly) but I think the big deal is that they simply don't want one person "being strong" (aka stubborn) that ends up getting everyone sick, and then you get those huge explosion of cases.

We will see what happens. All I know is after this week I get to work from home, which isn't necessarily a bad thing :D
 

Patio

Supporting Member
I caught some of the Joe Rogan interview as well. "Epidemiologists are the new rock stars of twitter."
 

sfsuphysics

BOD
Staff member
Gotta say while watching that, there were a few points where he seemed to contradict himself, or was arguing against himself which in my mind kind of knocked down the credibility of what he was saying, now granted it was a "live"(?) interview so I give him that as a possible excuse, however at the end of the interview (at least the clip) it seemed like he was simply trying to advertise his 2+ year old book :D
 

JVU

BOD
Staff member
The reason people are reacting much more to this than other similar things that have been around is because it’s new and at least with what little data we have regarding transmissibility and aggressiveness, has the making of a pretty serious pandemic that could potentially kill millions of people, and sicken hundreds of millions. Since we don’t have enough info to really know how bad it is going to be, and it has the potential to be REALLY bad on the outer margins of the probability curve, people are preparing for and thereby trying to avoid the worst. The irony is that the better we do at proactively containing it by treating it very seriously, the less severe it will turn out to be, and people will inevitably use that as evidence that everyone over-reacted.

The flu IS horrible and should be taken more seriously than it is every year. But it’s been around as long as Homo Sapiens has so it isn’t as scary and we more or less know what to expect from it, with some variability every year.
 

grizfyrfyter

Supporting Member
We are complacent about the flu. Like mentioned above, it's been a round forever.

The covid 19 isn't that big a deal if you're a healthy child or adult. 60+ is where the pneumonia becomes very deadly and being a viral infection, there isn't much you can do about it.

The possibility of being infections before you show any symptoms means it can spread stupid fast. My wife's great aunt is in the facility in elk Grove that just had a confirmed death from covid 19. Anyone who is in that facility has exposure potential and anyone visiting family in the facility also has exposure potential. One person came in with the virus, likely without symptoms, and potentially exposed dozens to hundred of people, who likely won't show symptoms for another week or more and may be infections.

That's why this is serious. It's not apocalyptic plague proportions, society will continue to function but the elderly and immuno compromised are a high lethality risk.

Reef Geek 3D Printing
 

rygh

Webmaster
Staff member
Last I heard, the death rate was around 2.3%.
In percentages, that is not the apocalypse.
But in real numbers, there are 7.5B people in the world. If everyone gets it, that means 172 Million people that may die.
It seems worth a LOT of hassle to try to slow it for a couple of years and find a vaccine.
 
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