High Tide Aquatics

Trident in need of frequent calibration

Krak256

Supporting Member
I recently purchased a Trident and have noticed that it needs to be calibrated quite often. I'm not sure if it was an issue with initial set up, but I noticed my readings were way off my Salifert tests. It required 2-3 calibrations before they were generally within acceptable ranges to Salifert.

After my reagents ran out, I didn't think I needed to calibrate again. I re-primed all the regaents but noticed after a while my readings didn't make sense and had to perform another calibration.

Is this normal? Am I supposed to be calibrating after changing out reagents?
 
Yes and No. I think Neptune suggests you recalibrate every time you change reagents, ( this is why they include a bottle of calibration fluid with every box of reagents). But, I have gotten away from not having to do this. I usually only calibrate the unit if I am suspicious of the readings I am getting.
 
What I would do is calibrate with your tank water. And use your Salifer readings if you don't have the calibration reagent.
Also not sure if you bought the trident new or used, but if you bought it used do this:
1) flush all your tubes with a syringe. Make sure you clean the tube for the water intake, water waste and the ones from inside the trident.
2) Clean the vial
And see after that if you have better readings.
 
I recently purchased a Trident and have noticed that it needs to be calibrated quite often. I'm not sure if it was an issue with initial set up, but I noticed my readings were way off my Salifert tests. It required 2-3 calibrations before they were generally within acceptable ranges to Salifert.

After my reagents ran out, I didn't think I needed to calibrate again. I re-primed all the regaents but noticed after a while my readings didn't make sense and had to perform another calibration.

Is this normal? Am I supposed to be calibrating after changing out reagents?
Generally speaking- I typically recalibrate after I replace B & C reagents- one thing to keep in mind that optical chamber does get dirty and so recalibrating it helps to take into account the light penetration in respects to measurement.
 
Also I don't recalibrate after each reagent replacement. I watch to make sure my readings will be consistant after I replace to a new reagent. That way you don't waste too much testing fluid each time. You want the readings to be consistant.
 
Calibrate when you get a new set of 2 month reagents and follow the directions. When you chage out A after a month, no need to calibrate.
If you ran out and didn't run the shut down task, you will for sure have to recalibrate.
Trying to make test kits 'match' will drive you insane, and I suggest you don't do it! Instead note the difference and let it be.
 
What I would do is calibrate with your tank water. And use your Salifer readings if you don't have the calibration reagent.
Also not sure if you bought the trident new or used, but if you bought it used do this:
1) flush all your tubes with a syringe. Make sure you clean the tube for the water intake, water waste and the ones from inside the trident.
2) Clean the vial
And see after that if you have better readings.
I bought a new one, albeit it was sitting in a box for a while
 
Calibrate when you get a new set of 2 month reagents and follow the directions. When you chage out A after a month, no need to calibrate.
If you ran out and didn't run the shut down task, you will for sure have to recalibrate.
Trying to make test kits 'match' will drive you insane, and I suggest you don't do it! Instead note the difference and let it be.
Ah thank you. I did not run the shut down task, which sounds like it caused an issue
 
I didn't shut mine down properly and it sat unused for several months. It hasn't worked right since. I've been a little intimidated to start flushing all the lines.

Those who have done this, it's pretty straight forward right? Just pull one line off at a time and flush it?
 
I didn't shut mine down properly and it sat unused for several months. It hasn't worked right since. I've been a little intimidated to start flushing all the lines.

Those who have done this, it's pretty straight forward right? Just pull one line off at a time and flush it?
Yes, I know the pipes are 100x smaller than you are used to, but I know you can do it. Unscrew the feet, pop the cover off, use tweezers to take each rubber line off, then push the solenoid and squirt rodi through the appropriate tube. Will likely take you an hour where the first half is wrapping your brain around how fluid moved through "pipes" that small. ;)

Might also need to clean the cuvette up top. Use rodi and a q-tip.
 
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