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Coral reefer

DBTC Officer
BOD
Also I would say only 1 yellow for the same reasons. In general the rule of 1 tang per body shape seems to be a good rule of thumb. The Naso gets huge, so have a plan for when they are too big for your system. The Naso's I just saw in Maui were easily 2 feet long. The yellow tangs were 10" dinner plates too.

I would get the 9 anthias and one of each tang. I love seeing them swim so actively. And I had 2 of them turn male in my tank, it was weird seeing a fish that I knew I didn't buy like that.

I like blenny's too, consider lawnmower blennies for algae control, and a fish that can cameflouge somewhat into the rockscape. I also like my Midas Blenny for a rock laying swimmer.
I’d say 3 yellow better than 2. Ime yellows get along with each other pretty well. Introduce together tho for sure.
 

H2OPlayar

Public Relations
BOD
I’d say 3 yellow better than 2. Ime yellows get along with each other pretty well. Introduce together tho for sure.
Agree, my experience was with one established yellow who became a bully. If you get 3 small to medium ones and introduce them together, you have a much better chance.
 

Blaise006

Supporting Member
I’d say 3 yellow better than 2. Ime yellows get along with each other pretty well. Introduce together tho for sure.
I currently have those two yellows and they are fine, but if I see aggression develop I will be sure to catch and rehome. Might add a third to help with any future aggression.
 

Coral reefer

DBTC Officer
BOD
I currently have those two yellows and they are fine, but if I see aggression develop I will be sure to catch and rehome. Might add a third to help with any future aggression.
Probably leave them alone if they are already together and ok. Unless you WANT a third. My suggestion was more for a adding new fish situation where I’d recommend 3 rather than 2
 

Blaise006

Supporting Member
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Finally arrived!

Trying to find one of those scissor jacks. That looks like it would be incredibly helpful, assuming it wouldn’t ruin the floors.

The tank will be surrounded by three walls. The width of the room it is going in is ~89 inches and the tank is 79 inches. I’m not sure what the best way is to get this tank into the room and then tucked away back to the wall.

Scissor jacks seem like the best option, but they don’t have any for rent at a tool shed.

Impossible layout?
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Once upon a time, we moved a BIG and tall tank through a window.
It was moved into the room the same way. We rented an equipment lift from San Mateo Rentals since the move took place in Burlingame.
If the window is big enough...
 

iani

Supporting Member
Once upon a time, we moved a BIG and tall tank through a window.
It was moved into the room the same way. We rented an equipment lift from San Mateo Rentals since the move took place in Burlingame.
If the window is big enough...
Bryan's tank?
 

rygh

Treasurer
BOD
Find a large sheet of cardboard, or tape smaller pieces together.
Then cut it to exact size of tank.
Then practice moving it.

My guess: It has to go straight in the door, then straight back. There is no way to rotate it in the room.
Although you could move it on its front face, then tumble it backwards onto the bottom.
That might make it easier to fit in door.

If you have hardwood floors, felt pads slide reasonably easily if it is empty.
So you could put it on the stand, then move it against back wall.

Make sure to leave extra space behind tank for pipes and such, then leave just a bit more.
You never have enough room.

Beware of moisture build up melting your drywall. Big tanks do that.
I stapled plastic sheeting to the wall in the alcove where my tank went.
 

Blaise006

Supporting Member
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Really considering changing the name to Culo Del Mar for this tank, anyone know someone that can get artsy with some drift wood?


The first batch of rock is done soaking. On to the next batch.

On to the next batch. I don’t think it looks to bad. Pictures make it look really flat.
 

Scott Sweet

Supporting Member
I currently have those two yellows and they are fine, but if I see aggression develop I will be sure to catch and rehome. Might add a third to help with any future aggression.
I would highly recommend reading the articles on R2R that are stickied on tang aggression and the order to introduce them in to the tank. Tang Aggression

This will explain the pecking order and the best way to introduce them in to your new tank. When I added my fish, I chose the specific order and waited to introduce the tangs until the end and then did so in the order recommended. I still have had issues of aggression when introducing a new fish that have mostly been taken care of by ensuring the fish are the right size and using a mirror. I do not have a yellow or purple tang because I simply ran out of room...though I wanted them...but I do have other tangs. I have two tangs that are quite aggressive and chase new fish in to a hiding place unless they are big enough.

I lost my early purchased wrasses for various reasons and tried to add replacements after the fact...that didn't go well due to the tang pecking order. The new smaller fish simply wouldn't feed due to the feeding frenzy that takes place in my 180 when I feed. The food is gone in about 30 seconds and I feed 5x/day.

When I had to capture and remove my Gem tang for antibiotics treatment for about 30 days, it was a little challenge to reintroduce him to the 180. The mirror trick worked and I had to keep an eye on everyone for a few days.
 
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