Reef nutrition

Reminder to check your back up power options

H2OPlayar

Member at large
BOD
Took about ten pulls, but I try to run this guy every quarter to make sure the gas isn't too gummy.

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CaseyP

Supporting Member
Do you store gas in the generator? I've had mine for about a year, but it's still new, and keep gasoline in a separate can. Been meaning to fired up to at least test that it works.
 
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H2OPlayar

Member at large
BOD
Do you store gas in the generator? I've have mine for about a year, but it's still new, and keep gasoline in a separate can. Been meaning to fired up to at least test that it works.
I do since there isn't a great way to drain it without running the fuel dry. I just check it a few times a year to make sure it still fires up, and I have a backup to this backup should this one go.
 

SepToob

Supporting Member
You can add a fuel stabilizer to greatly extend the life of gasoline - I do this occasionally if I know a racebike will sit for a long time. Siphoning the gas out is technically best but it's a hassle. The small motors in these things generally do pretty well with crummy gas anyway. I use a Yamaha one and it's dead reliable! Pretty sure it would run with lighter fluid.
 
I have the Honda 2200i and converted to Tri-fuel. Have been testing with Propane, Natural gas and seems to work great. I am not planning on adding gasoline unless I really really have to. Based on my understanding, no need to worry about anything if running with Propane or Natural gas.
 

Qwiv

Supporting Member
You should run the fuel completely out of the generator. You want the fuel away from the air and the small tanks in the small generators leave to much surrfave area open to air. They are not air tight either. The ethanol in gas really screws up small engines and they will start to gum up after time. You can research how bad ethanol is for small engines. I have to replace/service the small generators we barely use at work on a regular basis and the ones my guys use all the time keep working with no problems. My guys don't maintain the engines so they get trashed when not used. The service almost costs the same $ as a new generator too, typically requiring a new/rebuilt fuel intake system.

Store your fuel in an air tight jerry can, with a preservative and swap it out into your car frequently. You should run new fuel through the generator every 30-60 days as well. If the jerry can gets low with a lot of air in the can, just use it in a vehicle and fill it back up.

Better option for home is to get a Natural Gas/Propane conversion kit for your generator (or one that come that way) because once you put gasoline in the small engine, it is a maintenance task. You don't need to worry about that with Propane or Natural Gas. These kits run about $300-500 though, but considering most of us are not in the business of maintaining small engines, will pay for itself in not replacing generators. If you put gas in the generator, especially ethanol fuel, use it frequently. Good luck finding ethanol free fuel here in the Bay Area if that is the plan.
 

rdriggett

Supporting Member
You should run the fuel completely out of the generator. You want the fuel away from the air and the small tanks in the small generators leave to much surrfave area open to air. They are not air tight either. The ethanol in gas really screws up small engines and they will start to gum up after time. You can research how bad ethanol is for small engines. I have to replace/service the small generators we barely use at work on a regular basis and the ones my guys use all the time keep working with no problems. My guys don't maintain the engines so they get trashed when not used. The service almost costs the same $ as a new generator too, typically requiring a new/rebuilt fuel intake system.

Store your fuel in an air tight jerry can, with a preservative and swap it out into your car frequently. You should run new fuel through the generator every 30-60 days as well. If the jerry can gets low with a lot of air in the can, just use it in a vehicle and fill it back up.

Better option for home is to get a Natural Gas/Propane conversion kit for your generator (or one that come that way) because once you put gasoline in the small engine, it is a maintenance task. You don't need to worry about that with Propane or Natural Gas. These kits run about $300-500 though, but considering most of us are not in the business of maintaining small engines, will pay for itself in not replacing generators. If you put gas in the generator, especially ethanol fuel, use it frequently. Good luck finding ethanol free fuel here in the Bay Area if that is the plan.
I gained 50hp and 50ft-lbs on my old car by blending e85 with premium. You're telling me I cant just throw race fuel in my generator and get extra oomph? /s
 
You should run the fuel completely out of the generator. You want the fuel away from the air and the small tanks in the small generators leave to much surrfave area open to air. They are not air tight either. The ethanol in gas really screws up small engines and they will start to gum up after time. You can research how bad ethanol is for small engines. I have to replace/service the small generators we barely use at work on a regular basis and the ones my guys use all the time keep working with no problems. My guys don't maintain the engines so they get trashed when not used. The service almost costs the same $ as a new generator too, typically requiring a new/rebuilt fuel intake system.

Store your fuel in an air tight jerry can, with a preservative and swap it out into your car frequently. You should run new fuel through the generator every 30-60 days as well. If the jerry can gets low with a lot of air in the can, just use it in a vehicle and fill it back up.

Better option for home is to get a Natural Gas/Propane conversion kit for your generator (or one that come that way) because once you put gasoline in the small engine, it is a maintenance task. You don't need to worry about that with Propane or Natural Gas. These kits run about $300-500 though, but considering most of us are not in the business of maintaining small engines, will pay for itself in not replacing generators. If you put gas in the generator, especially ethanol fuel, use it frequently. Good luck finding ethanol free fuel here in the Bay Area if that is the plan.
Yes, I paid around $275 for the conversion kit but definitely worth it if I don't have to worry about storing gasoline and the related maintenance issues.
The Conversion also voided the warranty but I figured the warranty will be expired way before I get that many hours in the generator
 

JVU

President
BOD
I use a Firman dual fuel inverter generator. It wasn’t really more expensive and being able to use propane, which I generally have lots of, makes it easy to use and maintain. Low drama.
 

Qwiv

Supporting Member
I gained 50hp and 50ft-lbs on my old car by blending e85 with premium. You're telling me I cant just throw race fuel in my generator and get extra oomph? /s
The only gains you get with Premium gasoline is you can create more compression before the gasoline self ignites. E85 will ruin engines not designed for it, especially all your seals. If the engine is designed for the added compression pressures and heat and can be timed accordingly, then you can create more power. If it isn't and you tune it to do so, you will just overheat your valves and seals eventually like you were running the engine lean unless those were modifies as well. If you feel like you were going faster, it was because you had less money in your wallet weighing down the car.
 

rdriggett

Supporting Member
The only gains you get with Premium gasoline is you can create more compression before the gasoline self ignites. E85 will ruin engines not designed for it, especially all your seals. If the engine is designed for the added compression pressures and heat and can be timed accordingly, then you can create more power. If it isn't and you tune it to do so, you will just overheat your valves and seals eventually like you were running the engine lean unless those were modifies as well. If you feel like you were going faster, it was because you had less money in your wallet weighing down the car.
Sorry I wasn’t clear. I have a custom data logged ecu tune designed for e40 with increased boost and timing. I could switch between a 91 map and a e30 map with cruise control.
I really miss the down low torque of an ethanol blend custom tune.
My 60-120 was massively improved over stock!
I miss 5500rpm launch control from the factory. The Focus RS is a special car.
 
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