Jestersix

Rygh's 250 gallon - Rev 3

rygh

Webmaster
Staff member
Well ... I went to buy a ReefBot, and it took me to some separate payment site, and my Bank wanted nothing to do with that.
:mad:
Must be a sign from above.

Mindstream is still for sale, and sounds really great.
But as near as I can tell, none have been delivered.

Neptune Trident still seems hopelessly back ordered.

I guess there is the GHL KH director. In stock.
But that is really expensive, and only tests Alk, which may explain why it is not sold out.


--- OR ---

I can simply do like I do currently - Have the liquid tests still sitting on the side of my sump,
as I procrastinate yet again about testing "next week."
Not testing = Zero effort and Zero cost.
 

JVU

BOD
Staff member
All of these automated testers are 1st gen. If you want to tinker, which is a fun part of the hobby, then it’s great. If you just want to make water parameter testing easier and less effort, you should probably wait.
 

bluprntguy

Supporting Member
You may want to grab an API alk test. It’s faster and easier than any of the other tests, so it’s perfect for procrastinating reefers. Literally takes one step and less than 30 seconds to get an alk reading. It’s also only $6.99 so it’s way cheaper than the Reeefbot.

But, the reefbot is also available from saltwateraquarium, in case you needed another sign...
https://www.saltwateraquarium.com/reef-bot-automatic-water-testing-robot-reef-kinetics/
 

bluprntguy

Supporting Member
Red Sea is also one step. And better accuracy (ok fine, precision. Don’t wanna get lectured by @sfsuphysics!)
Red Sea requires you to fill up the plunger with the reagent, dose the reagent, calculate the reagent used, find the little card, convert the reagent used to alkalinity using the table...

with an API test you simply open the bottle and count the number of drops until the color changes.

You clearly underestimate how lazy I am during the week...
 
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JVU

BOD
Staff member
The Hanna Alk checker is also very easy, very quick, and in my experience more satisfying than the other kits I’ve tried.

Since Alk is the only thing you have to test frequently, there is a lot to be said for finding a good one you like to use.
 

Flagg37

Guest
The Hanna Alk checker is also very easy, very quick, and in my experience more satisfying than the other kits I’ve tried.

Since Alk is the only thing you have to test frequently, there is a lot to be said for finding a good one you like to use.
I think the Hannah dkh tester is faster and I trust it’s accuracy more than the API test kit. I started with API though.

Well ... I went to buy a ReefBot, and it took me to some separate payment site, and my Bank wanted nothing to do with that.
Must be a sign from above.

Mindstream is still for sale, and sounds really great.
But as near as I can tell, none have been delivered.

Neptune Trident still seems hopelessly back ordered.

I guess there is the GHL KH director. In stock.
But that is really expensive, and only tests Alk, which may explain why it is not sold out.


--- OR ---

I can simply do like I do currently - Have the liquid tests still sitting on the side of my sump,
as I procrastinate yet again about testing "next week."
Not testing = Zero effort and Zero cost.
@Scott Sweet I believe has one. So at least one has been delivered.
 

sfsuphysics

BOD
Staff member
Red Sea requires you to fill up the plunger with the reagent, dose the reagent, calculate the reagent used, find the little card, convert the reagent used to alkalinity using the table...

with an API test you simply open the bottle and count the number of drops until the color changes.

You clearly underestimate how lazy I am during the week...
They really are one in the same though
API : Fill container with water to 5mL mark
RS: Fill container with 10mL of water

API: Put in one drop at a time giving a little shake looking for a color change
RS: Put in drops giving a little shake

API: Remember the count, that = dKh
RS: Look at the syringe, that amount used translates to your dKh, mL x 5 = meq/L number (or just look at the card for that or dKh).

Red Sea just has smaller drops, hence the look at the syringe. API is great if you're fine if you're ok with an approximate value of your alkalinity to the nearest dKh
 

rygh

Webmaster
Staff member
I generally use API because of the simplicity.
Although I would argue:
1) Using a syringe for tank water is arguably faster than filling to 5 mL mark.
2) You can mark the small syringe with "in range" marks on the tube, and not bother with the number.
3) It is easier to shake the tube at the same time as squirting with syringe than it is to shake + add drops.
 

rygh

Webmaster
Staff member
You may want to grab an API alk test. It’s faster and easier than any of the other tests, so it’s perfect for procrastinating reefers. Literally takes one step and less than 30 seconds to get an alk reading. It’s also only $6.99 so it’s way cheaper than the Reeefbot.

But, the reefbot is also available from saltwateraquarium, in case you needed another sign...
https://www.saltwateraquarium.com/reef-bot-automatic-water-testing-robot-reef-kinetics/
Interesting. They have them in stock, and have points/cash back.

ReefBot actually sent me an email with a contact to buy it manually also. It seems they noticed the problem, which
likely means it is not entirely rare.
 

rygh

Webmaster
Staff member
All of these automated testers are 1st gen. If you want to tinker, which is a fun part of the hobby, then it’s great. If you just want to make water parameter testing easier and less effort, you should probably wait.
I thought it was clear - I like the tinkering part of this hobby more than the gardening part.
:)
 

sfsuphysics

BOD
Staff member
Interesting. They have them in stock, and have points/cash back.

ReefBot actually sent me an email with a contact to buy it manually also. It seems they noticed the problem, which
likely means it is not entirely rare.
do it man! Be BARs beta tester. We have enough Triton users in the club, we need others!

That said, just check their page for supported test kits. Remember you only get 8 spots for testing fluids, so if you use something like the Red Sea magnesium test kit that's 3 spots it takes up. Although I'm sure you can swap them out as needed, just need to reprogram the interface to say what vials are there.
 

rygh

Webmaster
Staff member
Current plan for testing with my 8 slots:
PO4: Red Sea Pro 2 slots
ALK: Salifert 2 slots
CA: API 2 slots
NO3: API 2 slots

It is a bit of a toss up on Mg vs NO3 testing. Not much of a problem with either.
But I figure if NO3 spikes, I need to know, where Mg moves very slowly.
 

sfsuphysics

BOD
Staff member
The thing is the NO3 & PO4 testing you can do like monthly, or do it more frequently if you are getting algae issues and trying to nail down a solution.

Personally I'd go for Red Sea alkalinity simply because it's a single spot only, and while that doesn't free up another spot for the sake of another test what it does do is free up a spot so if you want to do a 3 titration test you can as well. But overall what I would look into is which of those tests sells refills instead of the whole test kit, because you're not going to need test cards or bottles or what not.


Good luck with that though, it's a bit out of my price range for caving into my laziness ... at least for now :D
 

Chromis

Supporting Member
Cool! Hey is there any part identification on the airline valves? I would like to build something using automated valves and want to know what seems to work for others.
 
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